Would You Book Your Kids Onto A B737 MAX?

News : Travel

There is no doubt that, by the time the B737 Max returns to the skies, it will be the most scrutinised aircraft of our time.

As a frequent flyer, I can only hope that the terrible tragedy of these two B737 Max airlines crashes, highlights flaws in aviation safety rules and regulation so that this kind of oversight in safety never happens again. The horrific fact that these planes remained in the sky after the first crash, resulting in a second crash is, in my opinion, unforgivable.

But the problems for the B737 Max continue. According to the Wall Street Journal, there may be yet another design fault in the B737 Max which may or may not be fixed, before it returns to the skies.

“…The review process [over the MCAS system] is being delayed, at least in part, over the difficulty in operating the plane’s trim wheel system, which is a manual crank that turns a horizontal panel on the aircraft’s tail to change the angle of the plane’s nose.

A spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said it has been a known issue the agency is examining, but it does not expect it to delay the plane’s return to service.”

This turning crank issue is one of strength. In emergency situations, like high speeds and steep angles, turning the crank can require a lot of strength. The Journal reported that regulators are concerned that female pilots. who typically tend to have less upper body strength than men, may have problems turning the crank in emergencies.

So where does this leave the passenger? Would you book onto the B737 Max? If you were booked onto a B737 Max and discovered your pilot was female, who might not be able to turn the crank in an emergency, should you be worried?

Boeing’s approach to its safety and the fact that they appear to put profit above passenger safety makes me extremely uncomfortable.

346 deaths in two crashes along with news stories of underpaid engineers means that I would not book my son onto a B737 Max. If a substitute B737 Max rolls up to our departure gate, we will not be boarding.

Doug Parker told the airline’s employees he’d be on the first of these Boeing planes when they take to the air once again. United’s CEO Oscar Munoz told media he’d take the first flight too. While Doug Parker’s investments may be a stroke of genius, my family will not be following him and boarding the 737MAX. I want to be sure that my family will stay alive and get to their destination.

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