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On Thursday, one woman won the airline lottery when United ran out of seats on their plane. The result? United gave this one passenger $10,000 to give up her seat.

This happened after the snowstorm in the Northeast when some flights were oversold. Allison Preiss was on a United flight that was full and had a broken seat. They were offering $1000 for volunteers to give up their seat.

She did not volunteer. Neither did anyone else, but she was the first passenger on United’s list to be involuntarily denied boarding. She has no elite status with United and had the lowest fare class.

She tweeted “They really do not want to give me cash. They just offered me $10,000 in travel credit. TEN THOUSAND.”

This is interesting because, in the aftermath of the passenger being dragged off the plane in April, several airlines have revamped their policies on paying denied boarding compensation. In September Delta paid out $4000 in travel credit to a passenger they denied boarding too.

I have flown and reviewed United Airlines flights on a number of occasions and have never seen an offer like this. Bottom line; this is an awful lot of money when you consider the ticket was probably in the $100’s and reminds me that it is worth accepting compensation and hopping on the next flight for the sake of saving a few hours.

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(HT: ViewFromTheWing)

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